LIMA SITES FROM THE FOOTLOCKER


We had funny names for where we were in Laos. Our base was called Alternate, LS 20 A or LS-98. When you were in country you were “over the fence” or up country. We also referred to it as the “extreme western boundary of the DMZ”. The country was dotted with Lima sites abbreviated as LS. Larger fields were denoted simply as L like Vientiane (L-08) or Luang Prabang (L-54). Some of these air patches traded hands frequently between the Pathet Lao and the Hmong. One had to have an up to date dance card so as not to land in the wrong place. The “Customer” was the CIA- also known as a CAS or controlled American source. CASs had names like Mr. Brown, Mr. Jones and Mr. Smith. UNF was Unknown Nationality of Forces. We carried lists like these that were updated by the Customer every morning.


I found these online shortly after I learned how to turn on a computer. I was trying to find where I was when I got the silver BB. I can’t believe anyone saved them.  Another thing is I don’t know why there are so many marked closed. I personally know we landed at a lot of these to insert/pick up “tourists”. To better view them, click on them twice to magnify.

About asknod

VA claims blogger
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2 Responses to LIMA SITES FROM THE FOOTLOCKER

  1. David Linscheid (Air Force weather) says:

    I always loved the story about the STOL craft that got the green smoke to land at a site in order to deliver supplies. Upon landing, the pilot immediately realized that he was surrounded by Pathet Lao forces who had unknowingly assumed control of the site. What was the pilot to do? He immediately yelled for the enemy soldiers to quickly unload the supplies, because he had to take off and get another load. The Pathet Lao undoubtedly waited for that second load of supplies until the end of the war. Loved your lists; helped me to remember the names of some of the STOL sites.

    • asknod says:

      Yep. Made that mistake. During Operation Leapfrog in August 70, we landed at Muong Soui (L-108) to refuel. Nobody was home so I jumped out and grabbed the gas hose and started to climb up on the wing of the 0-1. A few rounds sailed by and we beat feet and took off with the wind to avoid our new friends.

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